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Art Resource Focus

Past 2009 and Archived Resource Focus articles

Maker’s Spaces, 2015
by Patricia Frischer, SDVAN coordinator

Spaces for Art at UC San Diego, 2012
by Sheena Ghanbari Program Promotion Manager of UCSD’s Visual Arts Department

The University of California, San Diego is a, culturally complex, decentralized institution that is spread out over 1,200 acres of coastal woodland. Much like the city of San Diego, the University has many different entities that work towards advancing the arts; the challenge lies in bridging the resources on campus to the general public and making accessible to locals and non-locals alike. Here is an attempt to (in a small way) consolidate and clarify the spaces for art at UC San Diego. 

The University has dynamic and well-ranked programs through the visual arts departments. The strength of the programs is reflected in the abundance of exhibition facilities at UCSD. There are nine different gallery spaces on campus—the Mandeville Annex Gallery, The Visual Arts Facility Gallery, and the Visual Arts Facility Performance Space are the three the spaces that are managed by the Visual Arts Department. There is also the University Art Gallery (UAG) that functions as an extension of the department, but aside from a yearly exhibit of graduate student work, the artists exhibiting at the UAG are generally not affiliated with the University. Additionally some on campus groups manage their own galleries; The California Institute for Telecommunications and Technology (Calit2), ArtPower! the Cross Cultural Center, and the Craft Center run the gallery@calit2, the Loft, ArtSpace, and Grove Gallery respectively.

In many facets of the arts, the lines are blurring. Exhibits are not always held in traditional galleries and there are countless innovative ways in which artists are showing their work, so the list below in no way limits the potential for exhibiting spaces at UCSD, rather here are some descriptions of visual arts venues that are affiliated with the campus.

Galleries Located in the Visual Arts Department at UCSD

The Visual Arts Department at UCSD is located in the Mandeville Center and the Visual Arts Facility. The Mandeville Center is located near the John Muir College and houses the staff offices and undergraduate facilities. The Visual Arts Facility is located next to Pepper Canyon Hall, near the Gilman Parking Structure, and is home to the graduate/faculty studios and graduate facilities.

Mandeville Annex Gallery : Exhibits the work of undergraduate students in the Visual Arts Department. Gallery hours are slightly varied with each show, but generally are the gallery is open Monday through Friday from 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Visual Arts Facility Gallery : Exhibits the work of graduate students in the Visual Arts Department. Gallery hours are generally Monday through 12:00 pm -5:00 pm.

Visual Arts Facility Performance Space : Serves as a space for screenings, lectures, and special events. It is the space used for the department’s Visiting Artist Lecture Series.

University Art Gallery (UAG)
: is located in the Mandeville Center. The gallery presents two or three exhibits a year that are organized by the gallery staff with consultation with the gallery council.

Additional Galleries at UCSD

gallery@calit2 : is located off the main lobby of Atkinson Hall, is managed by the research entity, Calit2. Both the gallery and the managing research organization aim to advance interplay among art, science and technology.

The Loft
: is an exhibiting space supervised by ArtPower! that is located in the University Price Center. ArtPower! is an entity at UCSD that strives to build creative experiences in music, dance, film and exhibition. There is also a Video Gallery just outside the venue—The Loft Video Gallery explores the use of film in public spaces and is curated monthly. 

ArtSpace : is located in and managed by the campus Cross Cultural Center. ArtSpace is a place for sharing work around the theme of social and cultural justice. It features the work of students, staff, faculty, alumni, and San Diego community member. 

Grove Gallery : is linked to the Craft Center. It is located in the old student center and displays the work of UCSD affiliated and non-affiliated artists.

Che Café :
is a non-profit co-op run by students community members, and while it is not a traditional gallery, they do present all-ages art shows. The Ché Café is committed to radical social change and equality and is located in Revelle College at UCSD.

Stuart Collection:

In addition to gallery spaces, there is also a vibrant collection of public art at UCSD through the Stuart Collection. The entire campus is considered a site for a commissioned, where the leading artists of our time (Niki de Saint Phalle, Robert Irwin, Richard Fleischner, Terry Allen, Nam June Paik, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Bruce Nauman, William Wegman, Michael Asher,  Jackie Ferrara, Jenny Holzer, Alexis Smith, Elizabeth Murray Kiki Smith, John Baldessari, Tim Hawkinson, and Barbara Kruger) have created unique site-specific pieces.

Off Campus Affiliated Galleries

Agitprop Space : was founded by UCSD Master of Fine Arts candidate, David White in 2006. The gallery is located in North Park behind Glenn’s Market on Utah Street and it serves as an alternative space for viewing art.

compactspace, Los Angele s : is located in the heart of historic downtown Los Angeles and is managed by Master of Fine Arts Candidate Glenna Jennings. The gallery generally exhibits work from emerging to mid-career multimedia artists, with support from the UCSD Visual Arts Department.

Sheena Ghanbari is currently the Program Promotion Manager of UCSD’s Visual Arts Department. She has a Masters in Arts Management from the Heinz College of Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University and has completed her undergraduate studies in visual arts and communications at UCSD. In her spare time she enjoys writing, swimming, and painting.

Past Art Resouce Focus 2009/10

Spaces for Art at UC San Diego by Sheena Ghanbari
Movers and Shakers 2 introduction by Patricia Frischer
Little and Large by John P. Tafani, Edited by David Lewinson
Movers and Shakers: Whos Who in SD Visual Arts Part Two: by
David Lewison
Volunteer Focus
The Arts: Ask for More
Bernar Venet – A Year Long Gift to the City

Archived Resource Articles

2008 past Art Resource Focus including:
Bernar Venet – A Year Long Gift to the City

Id, Ego, Superego- Movers and Shakers: Who’s Who in the Visual Arts in San Diego

Curators as Art Activisit
SD Art Prize 2007/2008: Roman de Salvo and Lael Corbin
San Diego International Airport Art Program By Constance White
Visual Arts Resource for the Physically and Mentally Challenged Artist by Melissa Regas, Honeybee Creations

2007 past Art Resource Focus including:
Firestorm Resources For the Arts
Lux Art Institute
Digital Who Done It?

Avant Guard
Juried Shows
Museum Collaborations
2007/2008 Art Prize: New Contemporaries, emerging nominted artists at Simayspace
CD and Album Cover Art by Naimeh Tahna
Buying Art at Art Walks and Open Studio Events
How to Get Your Art News
Furniture Design and Woodworking

Artists Demonstrators edited by Jennifer Meeder

2006 past Art Resource Focus including:
Furniture Design and Woodworking
Baubles, Bangles and Beads - Jewelry in SD
Museum Trends
Celebrating SD Art Collectors
Art Prizes
Shattering Glass MythsPhotography Focus San Diego
Competitions and Juried Exhbitions
Digital Art Booms in San Diego
About ArtWalk Walk About
Art and Healing
Youth Art

Past Art Resource Focus 2010

Spaces for Art at UC San Diego
by Sheena Ghanbari Program Promotion Manager of UCSD’s Visual Arts Department

The University of California, San Diego is a, culturally complex, decentralized institution that is spread out over 1,200 acres of coastal woodland. Much like the city of San Diego, the University has many different entities that work towards advancing the arts; the challenge lies in bridging the resources on campus to the general public and making accessible to locals and non-locals alike. Here is an attempt to (in a small way) consolidate and clarify the spaces for art at UC San Diego. 

The University has dynamic and well-ranked programs through the visual arts departments. The strength of the programs is reflected in the abundance of exhibition facilities at UCSD. There are nine different gallery spaces on campus—the Mandeville Annex Gallery, The Visual Arts Facility Gallery, and the Visual Arts Facility Performance Space are the three the spaces that are managed by the Visual Arts Department. There is also the University Art Gallery (UAG) that functions as an extension of the department, but aside from a yearly exhibit of graduate student work, the artists exhibiting at the UAG are generally not affiliated with the University. Additionally some on campus groups manage their own galleries; The California Institute for Telecommunications and Technology (Calit2), ArtPower! the Cross Cultural Center, and the Craft Center run the gallery@calit2, the Loft, ArtSpace, and Grove Gallery respectively.

In many facets of the arts, the lines are blurring. Exhibits are not always held in traditional galleries and there are countless innovative ways in which artists are showing their work, so the list below in no way limits the potential for exhibiting spaces at UCSD, rather here are some descriptions of visual arts venues that are affiliated with the campus.

Galleries Located in the Visual Arts Department at UCSD

The Visual Arts Department at UCSD is located in the Mandeville Center and the Visual Arts Facility. The Mandeville Center is located near the John Muir College and houses the staff offices and undergraduate facilities. The Visual Arts Facility is located next to Pepper Canyon Hall, near the Gilman Parking Structure, and is home to the graduate/faculty studios and graduate facilities.

Mandeville Annex Gallery : Exhibits the work of undergraduate students in the Visual Arts Department. Gallery hours are slightly varied with each show, but generally are the gallery is open Monday through Friday from 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Visual Arts Facility Gallery : Exhibits the work of graduate students in the Visual Arts Department. Gallery hours are generally Monday through 12:00 pm -5:00 pm.

Visual Arts Facility Performance Space : Serves as a space for screenings, lectures, and special events. It is the space used for the department’s Visiting Artist Lecture Series.

University Art Gallery (UAG)
: is located in the Mandeville Center. The gallery presents two or three exhibits a year that are organized by the gallery staff with consultation with the gallery council.

Additional Galleries at UCSD

gallery@calit2 : is located off the main lobby of Atkinson Hall, is managed by the research entity, Calit2. Both the gallery and the managing research organization aim to advance interplay among art, science and technology.

The Loft
: is an exhibiting space supervised by ArtPower! that is located in the University Price Center. ArtPower! is an entity at UCSD that strives to build creative experiences in music, dance, film and exhibition. There is also a Video Gallery just outside the venue—The Loft Video Gallery explores the use of film in public spaces and is curated monthly. 

ArtSpace : is located in and managed by the campus Cross Cultural Center. ArtSpace is a place for sharing work around the theme of social and cultural justice. It features the work of students, staff, faculty, alumni, and San Diego community member. 

Grove Gallery : is linked to the Craft Center. It is located in the old student center and displays the work of UCSD affiliated and non-affiliated artists.

Che Café :
is a non-profit co-op run by students community members, and while it is not a traditional gallery, they do present all-ages art shows. The Ché Café is committed to radical social change and equality and is located in Revelle College at UCSD.

Stuart Collection:

In addition to gallery spaces, there is also a vibrant collection of public art at UCSD through the Stuart Collection. The entire campus is considered a site for a commissioned, where the leading artists of our time (Niki de Saint Phalle, Robert Irwin, Richard Fleischner, Terry Allen, Nam June Paik, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Bruce Nauman, William Wegman, Michael Asher,  Jackie Ferrara, Jenny Holzer, Alexis Smith, Elizabeth Murray Kiki Smith, John Baldessari, Tim Hawkinson, and Barbara Kruger) have created unique site-specific pieces.

Off Campus Affiliated Galleries

Agitprop Space : was founded by UCSD Master of Fine Arts candidate, David White in 2006. The gallery is located in North Park behind Glenn’s Market on Utah Street and it serves as an alternative space for viewing art.

compactspace, Los Angele s : is located in the heart of historic downtown Los Angeles and is managed by Master of Fine Arts Candidate Glenna Jennings. The gallery generally exhibits work from emerging to mid-career multimedia artists, with support from the UCSD Visual Arts Department.

Sheena Ghanbari is currently the Program Promotion Manager of UCSD’s Visual Arts Department. She has a Masters in Arts Management from the Heinz College of Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University and has completed her undergraduate studies in visual arts and communications at UCSD. In her spare time she enjoys writing, swimming, and painting.

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Movers and Shakers 2 catalog forward by Patricia Frischer

In the second year of this two year project where we have helped connect artists with VIPs in the visual arts community, I have had time to think about the larger issues involved with two aspects of this promotion. One is what defines a Mover and Shaker especially in the future. The second is the use of the arts to define ourselves and San Diego as a creative center of excellence.

The best leaders are those that are as inclusive as possible. The age of exclusivity and snobbery is well over, thank goodness. These leaders build collaboration and diversity in every area , for example by mixing artists with non artists or the visual with performing arts. They are the most creative of the creative in the promotion, social and the fundraising aspects of their projects. They empower the young and embrace all the new technologies, or find staff and volunteers who can do so.

These leaders can think on their feet and have had to perform miracles to continue programming in times of economic challenge. They realize that artists and the public like to give as well as receive, sometimes in the same evening. Both audience and artists need education and turn to leaders to enrich their lives. Our community expects and should be given interesting programming, which is not static but always evolving and relevant.

Recently in a review of Susan Hauptman’s self portraits at the Lux Institute, Robert Pincus wrote the following, “Why do we look at portraits and self-portraits of people we don’t know? In fact, that question triggers others, more than it does an answer: Can we imagine a life from looking at a picture? And when we are intrigued by a face, do we make an effort to find out more about that person? For some people, the pleasure of a portrait may be more basic: They just like to admire the skill of a painter who can depict someone well. Or is the ongoing fascination with portraiture an oblique form of narcissism? …..” However you approach the second and final show of this series, we hope you spend some time to find your own answers.

A portrait is an obvious means of describing a person. But defining a community is much more complex and can never be done alone. Artists need the support of their leaders for the creation of new works. They need teachers, galleries, museum professionals, and association directors.  The art created should reflect the present and even prophesize the future.  San Diego is a region that needs an entirely new vision and it is our artists that will supply a new direction for us aided by the vision of our leaders.

Patricia Frischer is a founding member and coordinator of the San Diego Visual Arts Network, which funds the SD ART PRIZE, directory and events calendar and SmART Collector features. Frischer has taken on the roles of gallerist, curator, writer, teacher, website coordinator and artist. Her many metamorphoses make her difficult to fit into any of the usual art world categories. She is author of "The Artist and the Art of Marketing" and has lectured extensively on marketing for artists. She is a trainer of artists’ agents, art dealers, consultants and collectors. Her own artwork has been shown internationally and her most recent one person show was at Oxford University.

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Past Art Resouce Focus 2009

Little and Large by John P. Tafani, Edited by David Lewinson

What does contemporary signature jewelry share with sculpture in addition to their three-dimensionality and their identity as unique products of a particular creator?

From small, high-precision rings worn on the fingers to outdoor forms that can be seen in their entirety only from the air, scaling up and scaling down has been part of art movements since the post World War II era, and especially since the 1960s and Pop Art.

Why do similar forms at different scales produce different feelings and attract different audiences?  Does size change our perception of form and space?  Are beauty and art linked in our consciousness in such a way that most people will spend large amounts of money to buy and wear jewelry while far fewer will purchase even modest sized sculpture, let alone consider expanding their walls to accommodate a larger piece.  Is the cost and nature of the metals - from gold and platinum to corten steel -- the reason for the popular success of jewelry’s small works?  Why is small so beautiful?  Why is large so powerful?

Sculpture offers no equivalent to jewelry’s ability to convey social information such as what’s conveyed by a wedding band or an alumni ring. Yet large pieces by Henry Moore, Jim Die, and Barry Flanagan can play a similar role at the corporate level.

Beyond the respective various points of view of the wearer/admirer, it’s noteworthy to realize that most if not all of the famous artists of both the 19th and 20th centuries who worked with metals produced both little and large works; sculptures to wear and monuments for the city and landscape.  They shared an architectural approach to the shaping of materials, a recognition of the most ancient traditions of craft, and an awareness of historical forms combined with memories of chewed paper and macaroni necklaces made at the age of 4 to celebrate family love.

Perception by the viewer is dramatically changed by size.  The large creates a distance and thus enforces a distanced relationship between humankind and its surrounding environment.  In contrast, the little invites the viewer to grasp the jewelry in hand in what is likely a spontaneous desire to get closer to the skin of the of the beloved bearer.  In his ode to Jeanne Duval, Baudelaire captures this sensibility, writing “the dearest was naked and smiled with ease, she had only kept her sounding laces.”  From Alexander Calder to Bernar Venet, from George Braque to Max Ernest and Dorothea Tanning, at least four generations of artists have created jewelry, mostly for the sole pleasure of their loved ones. But sometimes the works are constructed for their art dealer or a museum curator, or simply as an opportunity to pursue creative teamwork with talented gold and silversmiths.

Some creations are ‘just’ changes in scale and material while others take old and out of fashion jewelry and transform it with the modern sculptor’s virtuosity and sense of style. 

Little and Large gathers the vision and skills of many artists and the diversity of many materials, displaying them under the California sun as it shines on natures’ and the human body’s landscape.  It is thus a unique opportunity to view and appreciate the creativity of those artists who have chosen to live and work in such magnificent surroundings.  Moreover, the exhibition is an invitation to people of all ages to question the relationship of human size to that of our complex environment.

John P. Tafani, a collector of and an editor/writer about 3D art and CEO of Apcis Cro in France. He is director and chief curator of Art_O_Centre Sculpture Trail and Galleries.

David Lewinson a San Diego based reviewer and critic who provides expert writing and editing services to artists and galleries nationwide. 

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Movers and Shakers: Whos Who in SD Visual Arts Part Two: by David Lewison

Movers and Shakers , Part II continues a visionary project launched in 2008 by the San Diego Visual Arts Network.  The project’s goal is to use the medium of portraiture to bring artists together with the many people who in a wide variety of ways sustain and support the visual arts in the San Diego region.  The list includes gallery owners and museum directors, public school teachers and university professors, collectors and public art commissioners.

The project reflects the energy and vision that motivates the San Diego Visual Arts Network: 1) to serve as a singular and powerful resource providing a vast array of information about the people, places, ideas, and events that comprise the art world in the San Diego region, and 2) to encourage collaboration and mutual support between the highly diverse elements that constitute a vibrant art scene.

From its individual works of art to its collective presentation as both a temporary gallery exhibition and a spaceless, timeless presence on the Internet, the Movers and Shakers project demonstrates the power of information and collaboration.

One obvious aspect of collaboration in Movers and Shakers is seen in the working relationships that develop between the artists and the people whose portraits they create.  “It takes two to tango,” it is said, and it obviously it takes two to create a portrait.

Less apparent is the collaborative process by which the portrait project came into being.  It began when the San Diego Visual Arts Network came up with the idea of bringing San Diego’s art VIPs together with artists through the medium of portraiture.  When the project was announced, many artists came forward to collaborate in the effort.  Others, drawn from SDVAN’s extensive list of artists working in the San Diego region, were invited to join the collaboration.  These artists were asked to identify the people whose portrait they wanted to create, or they could select someone from a list of VIPs provided to them by SDVAN. Movers and Shakers were also invited to select their own choice of artists thus assuring a cross section of talent and a sampling of support.

Whether standing in the middle of the Art Expression Gallery hosting the exhibition of the resulting portraits or scrolling though the images and information on the Movers and Shakers website hosted by the San Diego Visual Artist Guild, its easy, comforting, and perhaps challenging to feel the presence of so many people who share with you a deep love for and involvement in the visual arts.  They are people with knowledge and experience who represent resources you can ask to collaborate in a project that you’ve developed.

While Movers and Shakers demonstrates what can be achieved through imagination and collaboration, it is only one of a nearly endless number of possibilities.

GET CREATIVE!  GET ACTIVE!  GET TOGETHER!  GET GOING!  This is the basic lesson here.  An equally important lesson is to recognize that there are valuable resources all around.  Many of them are identified and described on SDVAN’s web site, and many of them are personified in the portraits that comprise Movers and Shakers.

David Lewinson a San Diego based reviewer and critic who provides expert writing and editing services to artists and galleries nationwide.

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Volunteer Focus

We are so pleased with the development of the San Diego Visual Arts Network over the last 5 years. SDVAN is a media resource for the city with our directory and events calendar, but we have also managed to do many projects to help the arts community in our region.

We are not the typical art association with a membership and committees for development, fundraising, exhibition etc. Instead we are organized in a loosely based large committee of over 150 wonderful people who mainly take on volunteer duties project by project. Each project has a start, middle and end and when it is over, the volunteer’s duties are finished. In that way, we hope we don’t burn people out and we try very hard to match make each committee member with a duty so that the volunteer is not only well capable of the task at hand, but gets something that they want from the experience.

Some of our volunteers come back again and again. These super volunteers include Kevin Freitas who let’s us link his Art as Authority column, was on of the Eat Your Art Out artists host, was the sacrificial act for the Performance Slam, wrote one of the introductions for Movers and Shakers, and sits on the Little and Large committee and is liaison for a venue involved in this new project. The rest of the Little and Large committee is firing on all cylinders right now includesLea Dennis, Susan Hirsch, Diane Sanchez, Lisa Van Herik, Thomine Wilson, Kaarin Vaughn, Kyoko Saito.

Also on the Little and Large committee are Philly Joe Swendoza whose ArtRocks! radio program has publicized many, many of our programs and Alexandra Rosa who heads the RAW gossip column.

Lisa Roche is our editor and proof reader on SmART Collector and works dilegently with all the contributors and translators like Karla Duarte, Vanessa Landero and Ana Paola Pérez Calderón.

Georgia Hoopes and before her Julia Gill are editors of the Picked Raw feature. Georgia went on to help with Picked Raw Peeled with other reporters Louisa Garcia, Amy Preci, Katherine Sweetman with Ann White, our eagle eyed proof reader.

Rosemary KimBal proof reads for Art Resource focuses and A+ Art Blog as well as the Eat Your Art Out and Movers and Shakers projects. Dennis Batt is the webmaster for Movers and Shakers with super administration from Mireille des Rosiers, Denise Bonaimo and Kelly Mellos.

Artists play a huge part in our volunteer program. SD Art Prize artists both established and emerging, Movers and Shakers artists, Eat Your Art Out artists, Little and Large Artists, Performance Slam Artists, Many artists have volunteered for more than one project like Irene de Watteville, Michele Guieu, Tania Alcala, Dave Ghilarducci,

We are so grateful for collaboration with Patty Smith at Art Expressions for Movers and Shakers, Ann Berchtold for SD Art Prize with Lee Lavy of the L-Street Gallery, and other SD Art Prize venues supplied by Tom Noel, Larry Baza (Noel-Baza Fine Art), Doug Simay, Lynn Susholtz at Art Produce, and other upcoming Spotlight exhibitions. Let's not forget the more than 30 new venues for our first county wide promotion Little and Large.

Where would we be without press collaboration with North County Times'Laurie Brindle, Espresso's John Rippo, Julia Spaulding of SD Magizine, Liz Edwards of Let's Play Downtown, Jeff Yoemans of SD County Art and Gallery Guide and consistent support from Union Tribune's Robert Pincus.

We have received masses of technical and design help over the years from Tom Wilson, Nadine Baurin, Angeles Moreno, Laura Lee Juliano and Melissa Reese. Susan Hirsch and Sheri Fox are already working on future projects for us to make us more snappy.

One of the unsung heroes of SDVAN is Noaomi Nussbaum co-founder of San Diego Synergy Arts Network which is the non-profit umbrella for SD Visual Arts Network and Synergy Arts Foundation.

Those who consistently attend SDVAN committee meeting and help us brainstorm include Naimeh Tahna, Marti Kranzberg, Irene Abraham, Judith D'Agostino, Mark Rodman-Smith, Steven Churchill. Everyone on our commttee of over 120 who reads the monthly agendas, report and minutes is contributing by speading the word about projects that we take on.

Finally we have volunteers that have never attended a meeting and we have never even met, like Leonard Fry who keeps us up to date on the ongoing events in the region. We actually consider all those listed on the site as volunteer spokespersons for the site spreading the word about the visual arts and volunteering their time to list their events on our calendar.

The coordinator of the site may keep the ball rolling (with the constant aid of her husband Darwin Slindee and emergency proof reading by mother Florence Frischer) but it is this enormous group volunteers who make everything possible. It is really quite astonishing what volunteers can achieve each doing an important part to make an enormous whole.

So think about volunteering for your own nearby art association, community visual arts project, alternative arts venue or for SDVAN. You may find you get more than you give. That is what we strive for at SDVAN.

Please note: San Diego Visual Arts Network is a 100% volunteer organization. No one makes a salary or takes home a pay check.

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The Arts: Ask For More

We are honored to be a partner in the The Arts Ask For More Children’s Arts Campaign by Americans for the Arts. Our article demonstrates how the arts help children and how parents and all of us can get more involved in bringing the arts into our children’s lives in the school, in our homes and in our community.

"For students living in a rapidly changing world, the arts teach vital modes of seeing, imagining, inventing, and thinking. If our primary demand of students is that they recall established facts, the children we educate today will find themselves ill-equipped to deal with problems like global warming, terrorism and pandemics. Those who have learned the lessons of the arts, however – how to see new patterns, how to learn from mistakes, and how to envision solutions – are the only ones likely to come up with the novel answers needed most for the future.” Art for Our Sake by Profs. Ellen Winner and Lois Hetland, 2007 

The Visual Arts

  1. Improve kids' overall academic performance.
  2. Show that kids actively engaged in arts education are likely to have higher test scores than those with little to no involvement.
  3. Develop skills needed by the 21st century workforce: critical thinking, creative problem solving, effective communication, teamwork and more.
  4. Teach kids to be more tolerant and open.
  5. Allow kids to express themselves creatively and bolster their self-confidence.
  6. Keep students engaged in school and less likely to drop out.

Ten Simple Ways Parents Can Get More Art in Their Kids’ Lives

  1. Enjoy the arts together. Sing, play music, read a book, dance, or draw with your child at home.
  2. Encourage your child to participate in the arts and celebrate their participation in or out of school.
  3. Explore your community’s library and read “the classics” together—from Mother Goose to Walt Whitman.
  4. Read your local newspaper to find out about attending local arts events like museum exhibits, local plays, festivals, or outdoor concerts.
  5. Tell your child’s teacher, principal, and school leadership that the arts are vital to your child’s success and an important part of a quality education. Find out if your school has sufficient resources for arts education, including qualified teachers and materials. If not, offer to help.
  6. Contact your local arts organizations to inquire about the arts education programs they offer either during school hours or after school. Volunteer to donate time, supplies, or help with their advocacy efforts and connect these services to your child’s school.
  7. Attend a school board or PTA meeting and voice your support for the arts to show them you care and make sure the arts are adequately funded as part of the core curriculum in the school budget.
  8. Explore your child’s dream to sing, to dance, to draw, to act—and encourage them to become the best they can be through the arts.
  9. Be an arts supporter!  Contact your elected officials—lawmakers and school board members—to ask them for more arts education funding from the local, state, and federal levels. Visit Online Resource Center.
  10. Sign up to become an activist on the Americans for the Arts website, just a click away! Through our e-activist list, you will get news updates and alerts about arts education. VisitE-Advocacy Center.

To view the  Ten Simple Ways in Spanish, visit 10 Formas Sencillas.

In addition to advocating for and supporting a strong arts program in your school district, you can help your child enjoy the arts outside of school by participating together at home, taking advantage of your community's cultural resources, or checking out resources online.

At Home

  • A simple paper and pencil or crayon offers children the chance to express themselves—even a scribble is a good beginning—the important point is for them to feel encouraged and to develop the habit of writing and drawing. Their skill will improve as they naturally compare their work to other pictures and words they see around them. Drawing and writing together will help them see that you value those activities as well.
  • Have pictures and books available for them to enjoy and value. Your local library can be a terrific source of material at no cost to you.
  • Seek out high-quality children's programming that can stimulate your child's imagination and expand his/her understanding of the many different art forms that exist. Public television is available with or without paying extra for cable and offers cultural programming for adults and children. If your child sees you valuing the arts, they will too.
  • Practice photography. Buy a disposable camera for your child to practice. Talk to them about composing a photograph—what is included and what is cut out through the choice of the photographer? What are the elements of and their proportions in the photograph? Work together on creating family photo albums or other thematic collections.
  • Make videos together. Try organizing the shots ahead of time to tell a story as in filmmaking.

In Your Community

  • Most communities have arts festivals or craft fairs—even seasonal celebrations that feature music and dancing. The more opportunity children have to see the arts in action, the more ideas they will get about how they can participate and contribute.
  • Attend presentations in the arts at your local schools, colleges, and universities. Colleges and universities often produce calendars of activities that you can call and request or look for online. Costs are free or lower than most professional venues.
  • Attend presentations at professional venues to help your child experience excellence: Many communities have museums where you and your child can look at art of different kinds. If you don't know of any museums, browse through an art store or gallery just so your child can enjoy seeing a variety of different artistic expression. Feel free to ask museum or store personnel to tell you about the particular works of art you are seeing. Museums often offer special events and classes at free or reduced rates.
  • Enroll them in classes that teach drawing, painting sculpture, clay arts. There are some classes that parents and children can take together. Private teachers and studios offer lessons but less-costly arts opportunities can also be found through local Boys and Girls Clubs, YMCAs, YWCAs, Girl Scouts, and libraries, to name just a few.
  • Check out a book from the library introducing your child to the visual arts: painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, and more. Knowing what others have done in an art form can inform and inspire your child as they participate in the same activity.
  • Check out books from the library that tell stories about visual artists. This will introduce your child to the arts and help them feel like they "know" various artists.
  • Help your child understand art forms that were developed by people of your own racial or ethic heritage. Or talk about family members that had a particular talent or interest in an art form; maybe Grandpa loved to paint or Uncle John was a good photographer. Ask them what art form they enjoy doing the most and encourage them to do it.

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Bernar Venet – A Year Long Gift to the City

The citywide exhibition of Monumental Works by Bernar Venet is not only amazing because of the sheer size and number of works, but because it is a collaborative effort between Scott White Contemporary Art, the Port of San Diego, San Diego International Airport, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the San Diego Museum of Art, The Omni San Diego, The Marriott Hotel & Marina, Harbor Island, Seaport Village, Embarcadero Marina Park South & North and the Laurel Street “triangle” through the city of San Diego.

The show which is spaced throughout the city is on until Oct 31 of 2009 which should give every one time to see all the works and perhaps even notice his works on display permanently in numerous other cities around the world. You will see Arcs, Indeterminate Lines and Random combinations of the two by this artist who is well recognized from his 1979 National Endowment for the Arts grant to his huge 1994 Champ de Mars show in Paris of 12 monumental works. The San Diego exhibition will mark an important and critical benchmark in the artist’s career just preceding his appearance at the 53rd International Venice Biennale exhibition.

Although it is great to walk around these large scale sculptures and study them from all angles, most of the viewers will simple be affected by these works by driving by them. The works are not easily missed and the power of the artist statements will be felt even at a distance. The artist enjoys seeing children playing on his creations and we noticed street people not adverse to finding a comfortable leaning spot on a few of them.

Some works are metal posts jetting straight up form the ground, others end in a subtle curve, still more lines of metal are completely rounded and almost casual in form. Our favorites were the random indeterminate lines which appeared to grow in squiggles on the grass but making one imagine the unseen portion perhaps buried deep in the earth. Many of the curved pieces had that same affect, wondering where the curve would go as it plunged into the ground. The sculptures become clues to the continuation of these lines in motion.

The supporting exhibition at the Scott White Contemporary Art (939 West Kalmia Street, SD, 92101) until Jan 3, 2009 is a super show in its own right. The charcoal drawings are intimate ad powerful and one of the best ways to learn more about the rusted steel works. We are pleased to see that Scott White Contemporary Art has partnered with ARTS: A Reason To Survive in supporting their arts-based programs for children facing crisis situations serving more than 25,000 children throughout SD County since 2001. A percentage of funds (contribution goal of $30,000) received in conjunction with the Bernar Venet Exhibition will go directly to ARTS.

One thing that this showing has in common with the very public New York City Waterfall by Olafur Eliasson is that it makes tourist of our own art patrons and connoisseurs as they view these works spread throughout the waterfront.

We recommend that you read the Robert Pincus review of this exhibition in the SD Union Tribune: He Covers the Waterfront

The exhibition at Scott White Contemporary Art continues until Jan 2, 2009. The sculptures are sited Oct 31 of 2009. For more information Kathleen Crain 619.501.5689

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Archived Resource Articles

2008 past Art Resource Focus including:
Bernar Venet – A Year Long Gift to the City

Id, Ego, Superego- Movers and Shakers: Who’s Who in the Visual Arts in San Diego

Curators as Art Activisit
SD Art Prize 2007/2008: Roman de Salvo and Lael Corbin
San Diego International Airport Art Program By Constance White
Visual Arts Resource for the Physically and Mentally Challenged Artist by Melissa Regas, Honeybee Creations

2007 past Art Resource Focus including:
Firestorm Resources For the Arts
Lux Art Institute
Digital Who Done It?

Avant Guard
Juried Shows
Museum Collaborations
2007/2008 Art Prize: New Contemporaries, emerging nominted artists at Simayspace
CD and Album Cover Art by Naimeh Tahna
Buying Art at Art Walks and Open Studio Events
How to Get Your Art News
Furniture Design and Woodworking

Artists Demonstrators edited by Jennifer Meeder

2006 past Art Resource Focus including:
Furniture Design and Woodworking
Baubles, Bangles and Beads - Jewelry in SD
Museum Trends
Celebrating SD Art Collectors
Art Prizes
Shattering Glass Myths
Photography Focus San Diego
Competitions and Juried Exhbitions
Digital Art Booms in San Diego
About ArtWalk Walk About
Art and Healing
Youth Art

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